Northwest of New Orleans

A monthly jazz variety show

Northwest of New Orleans

Hot Club of Spokane, Casey MacGill, Anna Jo Muhich, Cady Croskrey, and Mikaella Croskrey, Jenny Anne Mannan

Tue · April 11, 2017

7:30 pm

$7.00 - $10.00

Northwest of New Orleans
Northwest of New Orleans
A monthly jazz showcase/variety show hosted by Hot Club of Spokane
Hot Club of Spokane
Hot Club of Spokane
Hot Club of Spokane is an organization of local musicians committed to the preservation of jazz, swing, and blues, named for the famous Hot Club of France from the 1930s. Although the Quintet of the Hot Club of France is synonymous with the music of Django Reinhardt and what today has become known as “jazz manouche,” the original Hot Club was in fact an actual club or organization - not a band - begun by college students to support the preservation of jazz in the wake of the Great Depression. Hot Club of Spokane adopted a similar mission, and since its founding in 2007, the group now employs 20 musicians organized in five to eight piece ensembles that perform in and around the Inland Northwest.

Hot Club of Spokane’s most notable preservation projects have included an annual festival that brought New Orleans musicians to Spokane in the wake of Hurricane Katrina (2006-2009), and a “live music, documentary film experience” that tells of the rise from small-town childhood to national fame for Spokane’s own jazz royalty, Bing Crosby, Mildred Bailey, and Al Rinker. To reach younger audiences, Hot Club of Spokane has now developed a repertoire of electro-swing sets - that’s hot jazz and swing music set to hip hop and house beats.

Hot Club of Spokane has opened for The Stolen Sweets, The Portland Cello Project, Casey MacGill, The Shanghai Woolies, and The Hot Club of Cowtown, with additional collaborative appearances with Howard Crosby (Bing’s nephew), Hot Club of New Orleans, Matt Munisteri, Andreas Oberg, and Washboard Chaz Leary. Members of Hot Club of Spokane also briefly appear in the Rezolution Pictures documentary, “Rumble: Indians That Rocked The World” which tells the story of Native American contributions to American music. The film was screened at Sundance in January 2017 and will soon be available on PBS.
Casey MacGill
Casey MacGill
Casey MacGill performs music that swings. Nat "King" Cole Trio meets the Mills Brothers. Fats Waller meets Fats Domino. Slim Galliard meets Fred Astaire. It is American music of many decades and no decade in particular, all happening at the same time, woven into a seamless, beautiful whole. MacGill plays boogie-woogie, swing, and stride piano. He blows a lyrical jazz cornet, and his most unique instrumental voice is a 6-string tenor ukulele. He has been singing and arranging vocal harmonies for over 40 years, in a career that stretches from Los Angeles (Mood Indigo, feature films "Frances" and "Swing Shift") to Spokane, WA (The Spirits of Rhythm and the neo-swing classic CD "Jump") to Broadway (The musical "Swing") and finally to Seattle (most recently with the Blue 4 Trio). "I've played a lot of music with a lot of people," he says "and one thing I've learned is to tailor my arrangements to the individual players. It gives each musical situation a unique sound." He steers the band from his piano bench, alternately cruising along and sweating feverishly, switching intuitively between the ukulele and the piano and the cornet, singing and scatting, sometimes all within the same song.
Anna Jo Muhich, Cady Croskrey, and Mikaella Croskrey
What do these three have in common? Two are recent graduates of Gonzaga’s music program, and one is a current student. Two are sisters. At the Northwest of New Orleans launch event on April 11, they’ll combine to sing three-part harmonies, a la The Boswell Sisters, who were among the first sister acts in jazz, pre-dating the Andrews Sisters by nearly 20 years. And like the Boswells, Anna, Cady and Mikaella do more than sing – they all play instruments. Also look for Anna and Cady to take a few solos on the mic, and be careful Mikaella doesn’t knock you over with her dynamite hot jazz fiddle playing.
Jenny Anne Mannan
Jenny Anne Mannan
Northwest native Jenny Anne Mannan began her musical education at a tender age, touring with her family’s bluegrass band, The Bullas, and garnering awards at fiddle contests along the way. In 1998 she moved to Nashville with her brother Luke Bulla, where the pair co-founded a band and became fixtures in the Nashville bluegrass scene. Jenny Anne toured with country songwriter Paul Overstreet, and was often a guest of artists such as Ricky Skaggs, Chris Jones, and Jim Lauderdale. Since her return to Spokane, WA, where she currently lives with her husband, author Caleb Mannan and their 4 children, she has released a solo record, Saints and Sinners, in addition to lending fiddle and vocals to Irish band An Dochas. She has been a recurring guest of Sean and Sara Watkins on their critically acclaimed show Watkins Family Hour and has played with John Cowan at the legendary Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Her songs have been recorded by John Cowan ("Little Match Girl", Comfort & Joy) and Sara Watkins ("Lock & Key", Sun Midnight Sun). Jenny Anne’s music pays homage to her bluegrass roots as she chronicles the westward journey of a generation, a family, and a sound, in a style all her own. She is an American Songstress.
Venue Information:
The Bartlett
228 W Sprague Ave
Spokane, WA, 99201
http://thebartlettspokane.com/