Sarah Shook And The Disarmers

Country/Indie Rock

Sarah Shook And The Disarmers

Jason Hawk Harris

Thu · July 26, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$12.00

Sarah Shook And The Disarmers
Sarah Shook And The Disarmers
Sarah Shook & the Disarmers is an old school outlaw country/Americana band with punk tendencies. Inspired by artists such as the Sex Pistols, Elliott Smith and Hank Williams, Sarah sings with confidence, control, and, at times, a hint of menace. The Disarmers match her on every track,
coloring the tales of resilience and empathy with as much urgency as ever as well as a broader sonic sweep.

Her second album 'Years' will release on April 6th, 2018. At its pounding heart, 'Years' crackles with a pointedly contemporary and relevant take on the outlaw spirit. Built around the buoyant pedal steel of Phil Sullivan, and the post-punk rattle and Live at San Quentin hum of Eric Peterson’s guitar, there are echoes of Nikki Lane and Merle Haggard as much as Ty Segall. It's home is the ragged-but-real honky tonk, not the bro-country “honky tonk.” It’s easy to hear Sarah as a close cousin to artists like Hurray for the Riff Raff and Margo Price on the title track, or in the country-‘60s mod vibe on “Lesson.”
Jason Hawk Harris
Jason Hawk Harris
Jason Hawk Harris experienced his musical coming of age one fateful day in middle school when a friend played him Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Indeed, fate seems writ large in Harris’ artistic journey. He comes from a long line of musicians; a tradition that all but guaranteed a both passionate and vexed relationship with the guitar. Though classically trained, he considers it perhaps the greatest instrument ever created (and occasionally wants to smash his Martin over the head of its inventor). As a young man armed with a healthy prodigality, however, Harris refused to confine his ambitions to six strings. While his peers were trying to learn stick-shift, Harris was writing choral pieces and obsessing over American avant-garde composers like George Crumb. These broader horizons led him to earning a BM in musical composition. But after graduation, the dynastic power of his forebears reasserted its strength, and he returned to his guitar. Still, these days Harris often finds himself casting a wishful eye to the past. He laments the lost opportunity to collaborate with his uncle John Harris, who succumbed to the AIDS virus in 1991. “He wrote sad country songs about heartbreak, love and shame, “Harris says, “and he sang them like it was the last thing he’d ever do.” Taking up his uncle’s mantle, Harris’ songs offer nuanced explorations of life’s vagaries; matching determined honesty with vivid imagination. His upcoming record fuses robust musicianship with a poetic vision inspired by magical realists like Charles Williams and Haruki Murakami. His music, Harris explains, shares in their “audacious assumption that the physical and spiritual occupy the same plane of existence.”
Venue Information:
The Bartlett
228 W Sprague Ave
Spokane, WA, 99201
http://thebartlettspokane.com/